Assessment of undiscovered conventionally recoverable petroleum resources in Tertiary sedimentary basins of Malaysia and Brunei

702001-101142-939-B
Author : Keith Robinson
Publication : Bulletin of the Geological Society of Malaysia
Page : 119-131
Volume Number : 18
Year : 1985
DOI : https://doi.org/10.7186/bgsm18198505

Bulletin of the Geological Society of Malaysia, Volume 18, Nov. 1985, pp. 119 – 131

 

Assessment of undiscovered conventionally recoverable petroleum resources in Tertiary sedimentary basins of Malaysia and Brunei

KEITH ROBINSON

U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Mail Stop 916, Denver Federal Centre, Denver, Colorado 80225

 

Abstract: An assessment of undiscovered conventionally recoverable petroleum resources in Tertiary sedimentary basins of Malaysia and Brunei was undertaken utilizing geological and petroleum engineering data, together with statistical techniques. Results of the assessment suggest a statistical mean value of 8 billion (109) barrels of conventionally recoverable crude oil and 80 trillion (1012) cubic feet of natural gas remain to be discovered in Malaysia and Brunei. It is possible the 8 billion barrels of undiscovered crude oil is too large an amount and the statistical modal value of 5.5 billion barrels of undiscovered oil is more realistic. If giant discoveries of natural gas are discovered in the West Luconia Province, the statistical mean value of 80 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas is probably too small an amount.

In West Malaysia, the Malay Basin tends to be gas prone in the northern part while the southern part is both oil and gas prone. In the Penyu Basin and the Malaysian part of the Strait of Malacca, adequate reservoir sealing mechanisms, source rock, and maturation problems, may preclude the accumulation of commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. 

In East Malaysia and Brunei, it is extremely unlikely that the Sabah Basin, Balingian and West Luconia Provinces, and the Sandakan and North Tarakan Basins be almost as rich again as the Baram Delta was originally. However, the West Luconia Province may have exceedingly large natural gas potential.

https://doi.org/10.7186/bgsm18198505