Subic Bay fault zone: its role in the geologic history of the Zambales Ophiolite Complex, Philippines


Author : G.P. Yumul Jr., C.B. Dimalanta, J.V. De Jesus, D.V. Faustino, F.T. Jumawan, E.J. Marquez, J.L. Barretto, R.A. Tamayo, K.L. Queano & F.A. Jimenez Jr.Publication : Bulletin of the Geological Society of MalaysiaVolume : 43Page : 85-94Year : 1999


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Bulletin of the Geological Society of Malaysia, Volume 43, Dec. 1999, pp. 85 - 94

 

Subic Bay fault zone: its role in the geologic history of the Zambales Ophiolite Complex, Philippines

G.P. YUMUL JR.1, C.B. DIMALANTA1,2, J.V. DE JESUS1, D.V. FAUSTINO1 F.T. JUMAWAN1,3, E.J. MARQUEZ1, J.L. BARRETTO1, R.A. TAMAYO1,4, K.L. QUEAÑ01,5 AND F.A. JIMENEZ J R.1

1Rushurgent Working Group, National Institute of Geological Sciences, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines

2Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Nakano-ku, Minami-dai, Tokyo, Japan

3Extar Resource Development Corporation, San Juan, Metro Manila, Philippines

4UMR Domaines Oceaniques, University of Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France

5Department of Petroleum Geoscience, University of Brunei Darussalam, Brunei

 

Abstract: Several models have been forwarded to explain the distribution of the three massifs, Masinloc, Cabangan and San Antonio, of the Zambales Ophiolite Complex. Available information support a model that calls for the separation and southward translation of the San Antonio massif from the Acoje block of the Masinloc massif. Translation occurred along the left-lateral West Luzon Shear/Subic Bay Fault Zone. This would explain the presence of clinopyroxenite-gabbronorite allochthonous hills scattered along the western edge of the ophiolite complex where the fault zone is thought to have passed. The recognition of the existence of the Subic Bay Fault Zone helps elucidate our understanding on how this crust-mantle sequence had evolved. 

https://doi.org/10.7186/bgsm43199909